Game Theory

Buy It Now
  • 0
  • 0
Listen on Spotify

Game Theory received universal acclaim from music critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 83, based on 26 reviews. Allmusic’s Andy Kellman praised its musical quality and lyrical themes, writing “Spinning turbulence, paranoia, anger, and pain into some of the most exhilarating and startling music released in 2006,. Game Theory is a heavy album, the Roots’ sharpest work. It’s destined to become one of Def Jam’s proudest, if not most popular, moments”. The New York Times writer Nate Chinen viewed the album’s production as inconsistent, but found Black Thought’s performance more focused and engaged that on previous efforts, while writing that “?uestlove infuses ‘Game Theory’ with a hard sonic logic, so that the music often sounds as tough as the lyrics”.[4] Vibe’s Thomas Golianopoulos gave it 4 out of 5 stars and called it “a masterfully crafted, sobering wake-up call”. Jeff Vrabel of PopMatters dubbed it “The Roots’ darkest, grimiest, most unrelenting and possibly most focused effort to date”.
Los Angeles Times writer Oliver Wang gave the album three out of four stars and commented that it “moves coherently as a whole and not just assemblage of spare songs”.[24] Rolling Stone’s Peter Relic viewed the album as a progression over their previous work and wrote “For every head-nodding beat (and ?uestlove brings plenty of ‘em), Game Theory has a head-turning treat”.[18] Will Dukes of The Village Voice called it The Roots’ “most radical record to date” and commended Black Thought for his lyricism on the album, writing “Raw, emotive, and urgent as a motherfucker, his flow—on songs like opener ‘False Media,’ whose gangly steel snares give way to plush orchestration—is bleak and expansive and seething with wrath”. Robert Christgau, writing for MSN Music, felt that the album is “not hooky enough”, but “strong enough to compensate” with a tone that “maintains until the J. Dilla encomium that closes.”
In its end-of-year list, Rolling Stone named it the eighteenth best album of 2006, calling it “classic studio Roots”. It was named one of the top ten albums of the year by URB. The album was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Rap Album.

0 comments